Basic Ultimate Throws
Time 3.6 hrs

Difficulty Beginner
Prerequisites Introduction To Ultimate
Departments Physical Education
Authors Ross Parker
Groupings Pairs
Threes
Fours
Minimum Year Group None

Blurb

In this unit you will learn the two most basic throws in ultimate: the backhand and the forehand.

License

This work is shared under the following license: Creative Commons BY-SA-NC

Outline

Resources
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Cross-Curricular Links
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Teacher Reflection
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Credits
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5 mins
Throws
Many Ways
  • Throwing is the only means of progressing the disc in ultimate, and so is an essential skills.
  • Watching a great thrower (most likely to be a "handler" on their team) is mesmerising: the disc moves with incredible speed, stability and precision, landing right on target:

  • There are many different throws in ultimate, including, but not limited to:
    • Backhand
    • Forehand (also known as flick)
    • Hammer
    • Scoober
    • Thumber
    • Blade
    • Overhand
    • Duck
  • Many of these throws have variations depending on the point at which the disc is released (e.g. high, medium, low).
  • This unit will focus on the very basics: backhand and forehand.
30 mins
Backhand
The One
  • The backhand is the most basic and intuitive throw, and is where most people start.
  • Get a disc from your PE teacher, and keep it in your hand as you watch the video below, practicing the various grips and moves without throwing:

  • Find some outdoor space now and start working on your backhand, focusing on short, light throws to start with.
30 mins
Forehand
AKA Flick
  • The forehand is hard to learn than the backhand, but is much more versatile and useful in ultimate. It should be your go-to or default throw in a game.
  • Get a disc from your PE teacher, and keep it in your hand as you watch the video below, practicing the various grips and moves without throwing:

  • Find some outdoor space now and start working on your forehand, focusing on short, light throws to start with.
120 mins
Practice
...Makes Progress
  • Practice, as they say, makes progress.
  • Spend a substantial amount of time (at least two hours) practicing your throws, working up from short gentle throws to longer, harder throws.
    • Spend an equal amount of time on your forehand and backhand.
    • Come back to the two videos above (as well as other videos on YouTube) to keep improving your technique.
    • Aim to get the disc to fly flat and rotate fast.
30 mins
Finishing Up
Evidnece
  • Shoot some video of yourself throwing at least 3 good backhands and 3 good forehands.
  • Use iMovie, other other software, to stitch your videos into a single video.
  • Submit your video as evidence of your learning.
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